Mum's charts for getting her toddlers involved in household chores

Mum shares her charts for getting children to do household chores – but some disagree with her VERY generous payments

  • A mother has shared the charts she uses for getting her toddlers to do chores
  • She said that to encourage her children to help she pays them $1 for each chore
  • Many praised her system while others said it was unnecessary to pay children 

A mother has divided the internet after sharing a photo of charts she uses to get her toddlers involved in completing household chores.

The Australian woman revealed that in a bid to encourage her young children to to help around the house, she created a list of chores for them to complete including making their beds and sorting the laundry, in exchange for $1 a job.

‘I just thought I would share how we get the kids involved chores and how they are rewarded,’ she wrote on Facebook.

‘We basically printed our own dollar buck currency and the oldest gets bluey bucks and the youngest gets bingo bucks. They will get $1 for each job they do and so far it has been so rewarding for our entire family.’

A mother has divided the internet after sharing a photo of  the ‘brilliant charts (pictured) she uses to get her toddlers involved in completing household chores

 ‘Sure it takes me 10 times longer to do anything but it’s nice having clothes handed to me to hang out so I don’t have to bend over at 28 weeks pregnant,’ she added.

The woman explained that it has also made it easier when she goes shopping as the kids know how much they can spend.

‘It’s made Kmart trips so much easier too because we count how many dollar bucks they have to spend to cash in and their reward. Hopefully it might work with your little ones because our toy room has never been cleaner.’

Many Facebook users praised her for creating a simple chart while others said that it was unnecessary to give toddlers money.

‘Great idea, agree it takes longer but your doing an awesome job raising children who will be self sufficient adults with responsibility and respect for others,’ one wrote.

Another mother also shared a photo of a spreadsheet (pictured) she uses to encourage her three children to help around the house but admitted it doesn’t work

‘We all need to learn to earn our own money and this is a great way for young kids to learn and have value for money and feel pride in a job well done,’ another said.

‘I love this idea,’ one person wrote. ‘Brilliant,’ another agreed.

Others were less positive about the idea.  

‘Great idea but I do not think it’s right to pay kids to do chores around the house. They live in the house too so they should be responsible to do these chores,’ one wrote.

‘My five-year-old son does most of these chores and his reward is he is allowed to go somewhere special on the school holidays. He doesn’t get money or anything for it.’

‘I’m not giving my four-year-old $9 a day,’ another wrote.

‘It’s super expensive. My kids get 20 cents for each job but they only do two maybe three at most a day.’

Her chart includes awards points for unloading dishes and vacuuming and deducts them for rude and unhelpful gestures such as lying, fighting and leaving clothes on the floor

One mother shared a photo of a spreadsheet she uses to encourage her children to help around the house but admitted it doesn’t work.

‘My kids (three, eight and 10) have a point chart with rewards but it doesn’t seem to encourage them to help much,’ she wrote.    

Her chart includes awards points for unloading dishes and vacuuming, and deducts them for lying, fighting and leaving clothes on the floor.

Completing basic activities such as getting dressed and even brushing teeth attract anywhere between 50 and 250 points.

But rude and unhelpful gestures including throwing towels on the floor rather than putting them in the laundry basket cost up to 100 points.

Rewards like money, trips to the cinema, takeaway dinners and extended time on the iPad are awarded if the children behaved well enough to accumulate the necessary points.  

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