Tucker praises black mom for fighting school's critical race theory

‘Good for her. She’s telling the truth’: Tucker Carlson praises black Florida mom after she ripped schools for trying to introduce ‘racist’ critical race theory into the classroom

  • Keisha King, a black mom with a student in a Florida school district, claimed critical race theory promotes racism and will destroy the country 
  • ‘Telling my child, or any child, that they are in a permanent oppressed status in America because they are black is racist,’ she said
  • Her pointed comments were replayed on Tucker Carlson’s Friday night show, and the Fox host applauded her efforts
  • ‘Good for her. She’s telling the truth; too few are,’ Carlson said
  • Florida became the sixth state to pass banning critical race theory in schools
  • At least 10 other states are in the process of banning the theory

A black Florida mom, whose passionate speech at a local school board meeting against teaching ‘racist’ critical race theory made national headlines, was applauded by Fox host Tucker Carlson ‘for telling the truth.’

Carlson opened the segment with a video clip of a snippet of Keisha King’s speech to the Duvall County school board on Thursday. One of her children is a student in the district. 

‘If this continues, we will look back and be responsible for the dismantling of the greatest nation in the world by reverting to teaching hate and that race is a determining factor on where your destiny lies,’ King said. 

‘Good for her. She’s telling the truth; too few are,’ Carlson said during his Friday night episode. 

He added that that The 1776 Project PAC and its founder Ryan Girdusky are supporting parents and educators who don’t want critical race theory taught in the classroom.

Keisha King, who has a child in the Duvall County school district in Florida, made an impassioned speech against critical race theory Thursday night that made national headlines

Fox host Tucker Carlson applauded King’s efforts, saying, ‘Good for her. She’s telling the truth’

King’s comments were made after she was outraged at seeing teachers in the Duvall County school district – in northeastern Florida –  teach critical race theory and even separate students by their race. 

Duvall County confirmed it was invoking Florida Governor Ron DeSantis’s ban on CRT later the same evening.

During King’s speech, she disputed claims that critical race theory is ‘racial sensitivity or simply teaching unfavorable American history or teaching Jim Crow history.’

‘CRT is deeper and more dangerous than that,’ King said. ‘CRT and its outworking today is a teaching that there’s a hierarchy in society where white male, heterosexual, able-bodied people are deemed the oppressors and anyone else outside of that status is oppressed.

‘I don’t know about you, but telling my child, or any child, that they are in a permanent oppressed status in America because they are black is racist. And saying that white people are automatically above me, my children, or any child is racist as well.’ 

What is critical race theory? The concept dividing the nation which asserts that US institutions are inherently racist 

The fight over critical race theory in schools has escalated in the United States over the last year.

The theory has sparked a fierce nationwide debate in the wake of the Black Lives Matter protests around the country over the last year and the introduction of the 1619 Project.

The 1619 Project, which was published by the New York Times in 2019 to mark 400 years since the first enslaved Africans arrived on American shores, reframes American history by ‘placing the consequences of slavery and the contributions of black Americans at the center of the US narrative’.

The debate surrounding critical race theory regards concerns that some children are being indoctrinated into thinking that white people are inherently racist or sexist.

Those against critical race theory have argued it reduces people to the categories of ‘privileged’ or ‘oppressed’ based on their skin color.

Supporters, however, say the theory is vital to eliminating racism because it examines the ways in which race influences American politics, culture and the law.

Critical race theory teaches that racism is a social construct used to oppress people of color, and that it is present in almost all aspects of everyday life.

Its supporters say the theory helps illuminate the obstacles faced by BIPOC (black, indigenous and people of color) individuals in their everyday lives, that their white counterparts do not have to worry about. 

Critics claim it is unnecessarily divisive, and teaches children that they are either victims or oppressors from an early age.

Its been a source of heated debates across the country in the wake of the Black Lives Matter movement and the 1619 Project, and parents have even resorted to pulling their students out of high-end schools after the schools including it in their curriculums.  

Several Republican-led states have since adopted laws banning the teaching of the theory, with many more advancing similar legislation.

The Georgia State Board of Education voted 11 – 2 on June 3 to pass a resolution banning the teaching of critical race theory in schools, after Republican Governor Brian Kemp wrote the board a letter urging them to adopt such a policy. 

Florida passed the ban the same night that King made her speech.  

The southern states join Tennessee, Oklahoma, Montana and Idaho that have already banned the teaching of the theory. 

There are 10 other states discussing a ban, including Texas, Arizona, Iowa, Missouri, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, West Virginia, San Dakota, North Carolina and Louisiana. 

Florida’s Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis has been pushing for a ban on the theory for months.

He opened the the same Thursday night meeting that included King’s speech by urging the board to adopt the measure, calling critical race theory ‘really toxic,’ and claiming that it would cause a lot more divisions in society.

Florida became the sixth state to ban teaching critical race theory in the classroom while at least 10 other states are considering the ban 

‘I think it will cause people to think of themselves more as a member of a particular race based on their skin color, rather than based on the content of their character and based on their hard work and what they’re trying to accomplish in life,’ DeSantis told the board, which unanimously approved the ban. 

The resolution states: ‘Instruction on the required topics must be factual and may not suppress or distort significant historical events, such as the Holocaust, and may not define American history as something other than the creation of a new nation based largely on universal principles stated in the Declaration of Independence.’

The specifics of how the resolution will be enforced will likely be up to each individual school board.

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