Village on Loch Tay that's 'haunted' by can be yours for £125,000

Doom with a view: Forgotten village on picturesque Loch Tay that’s ‘haunted’ by soothsayer who foresaw death and destruction can be yours for £125,000… and THREE of her omens are still to be fulfilled

  • The ruins of former Scottish village of Lawers lie along the side of Loch Tay in Aberfeldy, Perth and Kinross
  • Are said to be home to the ghost of the Lady of Lawers, a soothsayer from the late 17th century
  • The land was previously for sale for £100,000 in 2016 but has now been put back on the market
  • Site includes ruins of Old Lawers church, a mill and Lawers House – the last home of Lady of Lawers 

An abandoned Scottish village has hit the market for just £125,000 – but buyers will have to put up with the resident ghost.

The old village of Lawers, along the side of Loch Tay in Aberfeldy, Perth and Kinross, is up for sale. It is said to be home to the ghost of the Lady of Lawers, a soothsayer from the late 17th century.

The land was previously for sale for £100,000 in 2016 but has now been put back on the market.

The three-acre site includes the ruins of Old Lawers church, a mill and Lawers House – which was the last home of the Lady of Lawers. 

She is remembered for making a host of prophecies, some of which came true. One predicted that the village church would collapse when a nearby ash tree reached the height of its spire.

When this happened, the church was badly damaged by a thunderstorm and was never used again.  

The Lady of Lawers also appeared to predict the coming of the railways by saying that what she called ‘fire-coaches’ would cross the Pass of Drumochter – as trains do today.  

An abandoned Scottish village has hit the market for just £125,000 – but buyers will have to put up with the resident ghost. The old village of Lawers along the side of Loch Tay in Aberfeldy, Perth and Kinross, is up for sale. It is said to be home to the ghost of the Lady of Lawers, a soothsayer from the late 17th century

And long before the construction of steamships, she talked of ‘a ship driven by smoke’.  She also talked of ‘a ship driven by smoke’. 

Also known as Mary Campbell, the Lady is said to have predicted the Highland clearances – when tenants were forced off their land to make away for sheep farming. 

This is the fate that befell her village in the 17th century.  The ruins largely date to this time, although there is evidence of a settlement on the site before 1473.

The Lady is said to still haunt the Old Village of Lawers and has three prophecies still to be fulfilled.

They include that ‘a strange heir will come to Balloch when the Boar’s Stone at Fearnan topples over’.

Another stated that ‘a ship driven by smoke will sink in the loch with great loss of life’ and ‘the time will come when Ben Lawers will become so cold that it will chill and waste the land for seven miles.’

The 1841 Census suggests that there may have been 17 people living by the Loch in the ‘Old Village’.

The old village of Lawers, along the side of Loch Tay in Aberfeldy, Perth and Kinross, is up for sale. It is said to be home to the ghost of the Lady of Lawers, a soothsayer from the late 17th century

The land was previously for sale for £100,000 in 2016 but has now been put back on the market. The three-acre site includes the ruins of Old Lawers church, a mill and Lawers House – which was the last home of the Lady of Lawers 

A 1906 photograph of the ferry cottage at Lawers by Loch Tay. The Earl of Breadalbane created the Loch Tay Steamboat Company which sailed between Killin and Kenmore via Ardeonaig, Lawers, Ardtalnaig and Fearnan

Also known as Mary Campbell, the Lady is said to have predicted the Highland clearances – when tenants were forced off their land to make away for sheep farming. Above: The ruins of one of the buildings. The image was taken in 2016, when the land was also up for sale 

But by 1891, there were only seven people, all of whom lived in the Pier Master’s house which was finally abandoned in 1926.

Sellers Goldcrest have listed the spooky sale for offers over £125,000.

They state: ‘The Lady of Lawers is remembered for various prophecies, a number of which appear to have come true.

‘Perhaps unsurprisingly, the site is said to be haunted to this day by a female; presumably the Lady!

‘The house is of particular interest, having been the home of the Lady of Lawers, its last occupant.

‘In the western part of the property is Lawers Kirk (c.1669), which lies adjacent to an earlier structure.

‘The buildings at the eastern end include a mill and a kiln.

‘The assembly of buildings here is powerfully evocative of an early modern settlement on the banks of the Loch and the edge of the stream, which powered the mill.’

The Lady is said to still haunt the Old Village of Lawers and has three prophecies still to be fulfilled. They include that ‘a strange heir will come to Balloch when the Boar’s Stone at Fearnan topples over’

The 1841 Census suggests that there may have been 17 people living by the Loch in the ‘Old Village’. Pictured: The ruins of Lawers from above

Historic Environment Scotland describes the site as ‘an upstanding and well-preserved example of a deserted settlement

The three-acre site lies by Perthshire’s Loch Tay, pictured, and is protected by a conservation agreement with the National Trust of Scotland, with any work done on the site subject to its approval

Lawers village comprises a small collection of houses, a church and a hotel.

It adjoins the A827, Killin to Kenmore road, from where a farm track leads down to the western end of the property. 

Historic Environment Scotland describes the site as ‘an upstanding and well-preserved example of a deserted settlement. 

The last resident of Lawers left in 1926.  In his book, the Lost Village of Lawers, author Mark Bridgeman detailed how the villagers were turfed out of their homes in the Clearances.  

Mr Bridgeman said in the Scotsman: ‘No sooner were the tenants turned out of their homes than the thatch was set on fire to prevent them from returning. 

‘One villager, who had assisted James Wyllie, the factor, with the evictions, was himself evicted.’

By 1841, only 17 people lived in the village and they were crammed in to only a few houses. In a bid to persuade the residents to leave, rents tripled over the course of 50 years.

Ferries to the area also stopped running. By 1891, there were only seven people. The lost inhabited property – the Pier Master’s House – was closed in 1936.   

Mr Bridgeman said: ‘Now the encroaching trees and undergrowth are gradually cloaking what remains of a community that had existed for almost 1,000 years. Together with the ravages of the Highland weather, there may soon be little left to remind us of a once unique way of life.’ 

By 1841, only 17 people lived in the village and they were crammed in to only a few houses. In a bid to persuade the residents to leave, rents tripled over the course of 50 years. Ferries to the area also stopped running. By 1891, there were only seven people. The lost inhabited property – the Pier Master’s House – was closed in 1936. Above: The beautiful views surrounding the site

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