Kylie Jenner Just Spoke out Against Racism; 'I Fear for My Daughter'

Like it or not, Kylie Jenner wields a tremendous amount of influence. On Instagram alone, the 22-year-old boasts an astounding 178 million followers. As the fourth most-followed person on the widely popular app, one cannot deny that she has a massive platform. In fact, Jenner’s influence is so massive that the Surgeon General recently asked the reality tv star to urge her followers to stay at home amidst the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

Though Jenner did adhere to the Surgeon General’s request, she’s not known for speaking out often about important issues. While she will occasionally post about crises on her Instagram story, her social media presence is usually all about her luxurious lifestyle. When the young billionaire isn’t promoting her brands (Kylie Cosmetics and Kylie Skin), she is posting pictures from her everyday life which is chock full of vacations, mansions, and designer clothes and accessories.

Kylie Jenner speaks out George Floyd and racism on Instagram

But, Jenner recently broke her traditional protocol to address a very important issue. After being moved by the murder of George Floyd, she took to her Instagram to speak out against racism. In a rare move, she elected to post on her feed rather than on her story, which expires after 24 hours. Jenner first led with a quote from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. “There comes a time when silence is betrayal,” the quote reads. Jenner then expressed some of her feelings about the matter and why she was finally choosing to speak out against racism.

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“Since watching the most devastating and completely heartbreaking video showing the murder of George Floyd earlier this week I haven’t been able to get his face and his words out of my mind. I’ll never personally experience the pain and fear that many Black people around the country go through every day but I know nobody should have to live in fear and nobody deserves a death like George Floyd and too many others,” Jenner began on her post.

The Kylie Cosmetics owner fears for her daughter, Stormi Webster

The 22-year-old continued on to share that she feared for her two-year-old daughter, Stormi Webster. As Stormi (and six out of nine of Jenner’s nieces and nephews) are half-Black, Jenner is aware of how racism will impact them in the future. Jenner concluded the Instagram message by encouraging people to continue to speak out against racism and hate crimes.

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since watching the most devastating and completely heartbreaking video showing the murder of George Floyd earlier this week I haven’t been able to get his face and his words out of my mind. i’ll never personally experience the pain and fear that many black people around the country go through every day but i know nobody should have to live in fear and nobody deserves a death like George Floyd and too many others. speaking up is long overdue for the rest of us. we’re currently dealing with two horrific pandemics in our country, and we can’t sit back and ignore the fact that racism is one of them. i fear for my daughter and i hope for a better future for her. my heart breaks for George Floyd’s family and friends. Don’t let his name be forgotten. keep sharing, keep watching, keep speaking out, because it’s the only way we can come together to help bring this much needed change and awareness. Rest In Peace, George Floyd. 🕊🤍

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“Speaking up is long overdue for the rest of us. We’re currently dealing with two horrific pandemics in our country, and we can’t sit back and ignore the fact that racism is one of them. I fear for my daughter and I hope for a better future for her. My heart breaks for George Floyd’s family and friends. Don’t let his name be forgotten. Keep sharing, keep watching, keep speaking out because it’s the only way we can come together to help bring this much-needed change and awareness. Rest In Peace, George Floyd. 🕊🤍 ” Jenner concluded in her post.

Fans and critics react to Jenner’s Instagram post

Naturally, Jenner’s post got mixed reactions. Some people championed her for speaking out and using her platform for good. Others felt that her post was too little too late and felt that she only spoke out when racism threatened to personally affect her family’s future. But, no matter what the reaction to Jenner’s message, this particular post is far more important and impactful than what she usually posts.

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Out of work underwear model becomes asparagus picker in lockdown

The coronavirus pandemic has forced so many people into career changes – but one woman has made a more unique change than most

Aniko Michnyaova is a top lingerie model, used to shooting for high-end brands like La Senza, Boux Avenue, M&S and Debenhams, but with work drying up because of the global crisis, Aniko is going to work fully-clothed as an asparagus picker.

The 32-year-old model has moved out of her West London home and into a caravan on a farm to pick and pack vegetables.

Working for minimum wage of £8.72 per hour, she does up to 10 hour shifts a day to earn £2,000 a month – what she previously earned in just a day as a model.

And, instead of sexy underwear, Aniko wears a bin bag to gather muddy veg on Cobrey Farm near Ross-on-Wye, in Herefordshire.

Aniko now lives in a £57-per-week three-bed caravan she shares with five others. But she was so determined to work on a farm, that she applied to scores of jobs as a produce picker.

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‘I applied through many, many websites. I went through all the big recruitment agencies,’ says Aniko.

‘I filled out tonnes of applications. I even had a spreadsheet so I could keep track of how many places and where I had applied.

‘I started the journey with two friends – who I call my “Covid Land Army” or the “Strawberry Team”.

‘We originally wanted to do strawberry picking but soon enough we found out that only starts later, like the end of May or June and we wanted to start as soon as possible.

‘What really motivated me is to feed the nation and I’d read many articles about how crops will go to waste if we don’t pick them.’

Aniko started her new role on 1 May and says she is happy to spend her time doing something good.

‘It depends on the order from the supermarkets and on the asparagus itself due to the weather. So it can be anything from a five hour to a ten hour day,’ she explains.

‘Picking beans or fruit is better because they pay after how much you have picked. So that means that pickers can make about £2000 and £2500 a month.

‘As asparagus pickers we are only making about £1,200. In my normal job, that would be a day rate but I have to adapt to the “normal” now and just swallow my pride and get on with it.’

The model says the work is fast-paced and the work is pretty relentless.

‘When working in the grading house, they have seven machines – or “lines” as we call them,’ she says.

‘Imagine this like a machine gun shooting asparagus at you with the speed of light.

‘We have to pick a bunch up and grade them into ten different boxes, from extra fine, to jumbo and rubbish.

‘Sometimes I feel like I’m in a war zone. If I just turn for five seconds, when I’m back in my little tube, it’s full again.

‘Sometimes it’s so much asparagus-volcano flying at you that we have five of the best people grading like little robots.’

She also says it has been fascinating to learn about farming and to witness just how fast asparagus can grow.

‘If it’s picked a day late, then it’s all rubbish,’ she explains.

‘We all know that if the asparagus is too flowery, that we are going to have a very long and hard day.

‘I never imagined this is how we grade vegetables and fruit.’

The Hungarian-born model – who has lived in the UK for eleven years – has been amazed at how much we actually waste.

‘We throw out so much just because it has a curve in them and when we go to the shops and pick up a bunch of asparagus, we still judge them and if we don’t like it, we put it back, which is so crazy because all these veggies have been graded by hand,’ she says.

‘It’s crazy to think about how picky we are. Also, I will definitely wash my fruit and veg once I take them home.’

In her new job, Aniko wears a blue hair net and gloves, which she says looks ‘ridiculous’.

‘My parents just told me to not get sick,’ she adds.

‘Social distancing definitely would be hard at this place. Everybody needs to work close and for some reason, there is no sign of the virus here.

‘It feels like we are in a normal world.’

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Outlander star addresses ‘challenging’ sex scenes: ‘Wasn’t looking forward to them’

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Outlander is known for being an intense love story between time traveller Claire and highlander Jamie so it’s not surprising that the pair have been shown having passionate sex multiple times on the Starz show. The fifth season of the show saw Claire appear to help bring her husband back from the brink of death with a sexual act after he sustained a snake bite. Fans were stunned by the steamy scene but Sam explained he has a good relationship with co-star Caitriona.

When asked if he was “uncomfortable” with sex scenes early on in the series, Sam explained: “I’d been nude in some theatre productions before but wasn’t really looking forward to these scenes.

“They were challenging, but me and my co-star have a good understanding.

“We try to use every intimate scene to show a little more of their relationship or how they relate to each other.

“Over time this has deepened and their love for each other just gets better and better.”

READ MORE

  • Outlander season 6: Jamie and Claire’s fate ‘changed’ by Brianna

Explaining what life can be like as Jamie, the actor told Gio Journal: “Sometimes I wish he’d take a day off.

“Shooting is very intense, and he’s always involved in some way.

“Haha, maybe he could take a vacation once in a while.”

However Sam added: “But honestly, I wouldn’t have it any other way.”

YOU CAN SIGN UP TO AMAZON PRIME TO WATCH SEASON 1-5 OF OUTLANDER HERE WITH A 30-DAY FREE TRIAL

 

It’s not the first time Sam has opened up about shooting intimate scenes.

Following on from the racy sex act, which brought Jamie back from death.

He told Glamour: “What we wanted to do was show that through her touch.

“I think that she has this ability, I wouldn’t say it’s magical, but maybe it is.

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It’s not the first time Sam has opened up about shooting intimate scenes.

Following on from the racy sex act, which brought Jamie back from death.

He told Glamour: “What we wanted to do was show that through her touch.

“I think that she has this ability, I wouldn’t say it’s magical, but maybe it is.

READ MORE

  • Outlander: Did Jamie Fraser travel to the future in ‘death’ scene?

In a Q&A with W Network, he was asked: “@w_network @SamHeughan Any idea as to when season 6 will begin production?”

“We were supposed to start this week,” he told his 647,200 Twitter followers.

“We have scheduled for Fall. Will just have to see…”

It looks like fans will be facing a long Droughtlander before they find out what happens to the Fraser family next.

Outlander seasons 1-5 are available to stream on Amazon Prime now.

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'Out' Trailer: Disney+ Debuts Heartwarming LGBTQ Pixar SparkShorts Film

Pixar has been steadily churning out animated shorts through its SparkShorts program, an initiative dedicated to cultivating new talent through short films, that has allowed Pixar animators to experiment with more than the 3D animation the studio is known for. Everything from hand-drawn animation to new styles of CG animation are on display in the shorts, which first debuted theatrically and on YouTube last year before moving to Disney+. And Disney+ has kept the program alive, steadily releasing new shorts that remind us of the magic of Pixar shorts.

Out Trailer

Out is a new Pixar SparkShorts short film that broaches the uncomfortable subject of coming out to one’s parents. In a beautiful, warm hand-drawn animation style that resembles that of a children’s coloring book, the Out trailer follows a man named Greg who chats with his dog Jim while holding a framed photo of himself and his boyfriend, Manuel. Greg is talking his way through coming out to his parents, when the doorbell rings and his parents arrive to help move him out of his house. But in a panic, he leaves the picture frame to be discovered by his mom, in a cliffhanger ending for the trailer. The trailer is sweet and short (what else can you be, while teasing a Pixar short film?) and even features a cameo from Toy Story character Wheezy (check out the penguin in Jim the dog’s mouth).

Pixar’s SparkShorts was launched in 2019, with the three inaugural short films getting a theatrical and YouTube debut before getting added to Disney+ upon the platform’s November 2019 launch. The first three shorts, Float,Purl, Smash and Grab, were soon joined by Kitbull,Windand Loopwhich debuted on Disney+ in the following months. The program is meant to further the informal practice of Pixar shorts as a medium for rising Pixar animators to experiment with new technologies and hone their storytelling skills, which were then shown before Pixar theatrical releases. But those Pixar shorts were soon replaced by Disney or Simpsons shorts, with the beloved experimental Pixar shorts moving online.

“The SparkShorts program is designed to discover new storytellers, explore new storytelling techniques, and experiment with new production workflows,” President of Pixar Animation Studios Jim Morris said in a statement when the program was launched in January 2019. “These films are unlike anything we’ve ever done at Pixar, providing an opportunity to unlock the potential of individual artists and their inventive filmmaking approaches on a smaller scale than our normal fare.”

You can watch Out on Disney+ now.

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Fight breaks out over hanged doll representing Gov Whitmer as armed militia protest Michigan lockdown – The Sun

A FIGHT broke out over a hanged doll representing Governor Gretchen Whitmer as armed militia protested against the Michigan coronavirus lockdown.

Police said the brawl erupted between two demonstrators after one tried to take a sign from the other's hand.


A witness told MLive that the fight broke out after a man carrying a garbage can filled with a sign, an ax and an American flag, removed the flag from the trash.

He added that attached to the flag was a naked doll with brown hair hanging from a noose.

Protest organizers reportedly called the display "hate speech."

The witness said that the scuffle started when one protester tried to remove the doll from the flag.



Cops confirmed that both parties were interviewed by officers and there were no injuries or arrests made.

However, dozens of other protesters gathered at the state's Capitol denouncing the coronavirus lockdown rules.

Many of the angry locals were seen carrying guns, wearing gasmasks and carrying demanding their "freedom."

Thursday's demonstration is the third planned in Michigan since Gov Gretchen Whitmer enforced stay-at-home orders.


Whitmer became a target of the protest on social media last week, the Metro Times reported.

"We need a good old fashioned lynch mob to storm the Capitol, drag her tyrannical a** out onto the street and string her up as our forefathers would have," someone reportedly wrote in a Facebook group named "People of Michigan vs. Gov. Gretchen Whitmer."

Another said: “Drag that tyrant governor out to the front lawn. Fit her for a noose.”

Others suggests that Whitmer should be shot, beaten or beheaded, according to the local outlet.

On Wednesday, the governor told ABC: "I would be not truthful if I said it didn't bother me. It certainly does.

"These protests, in a perverse way, make it likelier that we're going to stay in a stay-home posture.

"The whole point of them supposedly is that they don't want to be doing that."

She continued: "These have been, really, political rallies, where people come with Confederate flags and Nazi symbolism and calling for violence.

"This is not appropriate in a global pandemic, but it's certainly not an exercise of democratic principles, where we have free speech.

"This is calls to violence," she said. "This is racist and misogynistic."

Earlier this month, the governor slammed the recent protests inside the state capitol, saying the demonstration reminded her of some of the "worst racism” in US history.

In an interview on CNN's State of the Union, Whitmer called the protest of armed citizens "outrageous" and said their behavior "is not representative of who we are."

"Some of the outrageousness of what happened at our capitol depicted some of the worst racism and awful parts of our history in this country," she told host Jake Tapper.

"The Confederate Flags, and nooses, the swastikas, the behavior that you have seen in all of the clips is not representative of who we are in Michigan," she continued.

Michigan has lost at least 4,714 residents to the novel coronavirus, adding to the country's death toll of 85,197.

The United States currently has a total of 1,223,419 confirmed cases.

However, 205,268 have recovered from the disease.

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Check Out The ‘For Life’ Podcast While Waiting For Season 2 News

After a 13-episode first season, For Life is wrapping up on May 12. Fans of the show are already hopeful for a For Life Season 2, but that may not be in the cards for this ABC show. The first season, though it has garnered a positive response from fans and critics, has a pretty low weekly viewer turnout in the grand scheme of the network’s programming.

For Life is averaging 2.4 million viewers per week, which makes it the second least-viewed scripted show on ABC. But even though it’s low on viewership, those who are tuning in are passionate fans. The series has an 86 percent critics score and a 90 percent audience score on the review aggregator site Rotten Tomatoes. There have also already been calls from viewers online to bring the show back for Season 2. If that’s enough for ABC to take a chance on the series again, it can continue to explore Aaron Wallace’s story of wrongful conviction in another 13 or more episodes. And if it does return, it will likely remain a midseason show, since it doesn’t have quite the following to nab a coveted fall TV spot. This means that fans could perhaps expect a February 2021 premiere date.

That may seem like a while away, but it’s actually better news for the show than an earlier premiere. Season 1 premiered in February 2020 and filmed the previous October and November, which would mean that a second season would likely kick off production around the same time this year. By October, the coronavirus pandemic may be slowed down enough for the series to film, versus shows that typically film in July for fall release dates. Those fall shows have a higher chance of being delayed than a midseason series.

Or, if stay at home orders extend longer than that, the show could even try following fellow legal series All Rise‘s lead to do a remote episode or two until production can start up. Returning TV shows are going to have to get creative this year, that’s for sure.

In the meantime, while fans wait to hear news about whether Season 2 will happen or not, they can check out the show’s six-episode companion podcast. Called For Life: The Podcast, it’s hosted by Isaac Wright Jr. — whose real life wrongful conviction story inspired the show and the Aaron Wallace character. Wright Jr. will be sharing stories about other wrongfully convicted people and how they persevered until their eventual exonerations. And, who knows, maybe some of the podcast cases could make for compelling Season 2 storyline inspirations.

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Boris Johnson sets out tentative 'exit plan' from coronavirus lockdown

Baby steps to freedom: Boris Johnson finally sets out tentative three-stage ‘exit plan’ from coronavirus lockdown with people urged to go back to work, unlimited exercise – and schools can return next month if it goes well

  • Boris Johnson is making an address to the nation laying out his ‘exit strategy’ from the coronavirus lockdown 
  • The premier tells Britons to ‘stay alert, control virus and save lives’ in new government coronavirus slogan
  • His ‘conditional’ plan could see schools start to open next month and parts of hospitality industry in July 
  • He will introduce a five-tier DefCon-style warning system to monitor the threat the virus poses in the UK 
  • Garden centres will be given the green light to reopen from Wednesday with ‘social distancing’ rules in place 
  • Once-a-day-rule on outdoor exercise is being ditched and bigger focus on going to work where possible  
  • There are concerns No 10’s order to ‘stay at home’ had been too effective and damaged the UK economy
  • PM has come under fire from politicians and union leaders for ‘mistake’ and ‘total joke’ new ‘stay alert’ mantra
  • It comes as Britain recorded 346 coronavirus deaths yesterday, taking the country’s death toll to 31,587 
  • Here’s how to help people impacted by Covid-19

Key points of Boris Johnson’s lockdown exit strategy

After almost two months of lockdown, Boris Johnson has set out what he called ‘the first sketch of a road map for reopening society’.

Here are the key points: 

  • From Monday, people who cannot work from home are being actively encouraged to go to work instead of being told to only go if they must. But they should avoid public transport if at all possible.
  • From Wednesday, people are being encouraged to take unlimited amounts of outdoor exercise and even play sports, but only with members of their household.
  • Visiting and sunbathing in local parks will also be allowed as will driving to other destinations.
  • But social distancing rules will still have to be obeyed with bigger fines for those who break them.
  • Primary schools may begin to reopen by June 1 at the earliest along with the phased reopening of shops.
  • But secondary schools are not expected to reopen before the summer holidays. 
  • Some pubs, restaurants, hotels and other public places could begin to reopen in July at the earliest ‘if and only if the numbers support it’.
  • A new Covid Alert System is being set up determined mainly by the reinfection rate and the number of cases.
  • The alert levels will be one to five and the higher the level, the tougher social distancing measures will have to be. 
  • The PM said the UK had been in Level Four but ‘we are now in a position to begin to move in steps to Level Three’.
  • Level one would mean coronavirus is no longer around while Level Five would be the NHS being overwhelmed by a fresh outbreak. 

Boris Johnson urged the country to go back to work tonight as he finally set out his tentative three-stage ‘exit plan’ from coronavirus lockdown – with schools potentially reopening from next month.

In a TV address to the nation from Downing Street as the UK’s united front threatens to crumble, the PM paid tribute to the ‘sacrifice’ of Britons in reining in the killer disease, and insisted the government’s top priority is to ensure those efforts are not ‘thrown away’.

But while he stressed the need for caution, Mr Johnson delivered a striking message about ‘colossal’ impact on our ‘way of life’ and the importance of getting the economy up and running, amid fears that the draconian restrictions are causing the worst recession in 300 years.

From tomorrow anyone who cannot work from home – even if they are not carrying out an essential function – is being ‘actively encouraged’ to return to their duties. Mr Johnson said they should try not to use public transport, and safety guidance had been developed for businesses, but in a clear signal he said: ‘Work from home if you can, but you should go to work if you can’t work from home.’  

Mr Johnson insisted the wider lockdown will remain in place, including ‘social distancing’ rules for people to be two metres apart where possible, and fines will even be increased – with details to be fleshed out to Parliament tomorrow. He said the critical R number is currently estimated at between 0.5 and 1, and the ‘brakes’ could be put on if the situation deteriorates in areas. 

However, he said sunbathing and unlimited outdoor exercise – even if it is not local to your home – will be permitted from Wednesday. Sports such as tennis and golf can happen, albeit only within your own household.

And his ‘road map’ makes clear that as long as the battle against the disease is succeeding, primary schools could start opening from the beginning of next month, with reception, Year 1 and Year 6 the first to go back.

‘Our ambition is that secondary pupils facing exams next year will get at least some time with their teachers before the holidays,’ Mr Johnson said. 

A DefCon-style system is being introduced to describe the country’s outbreak condition, with the UK currently being at the second most serious rating of four. 

More shops could reopen in June – and Mr Johnson even suggested that some parts of the hospitality industry could be making a comeback by July. 

The premier insisted that the steps were all ‘conditional’ on the outbreak remaining under control and there were ‘big Ifs’ about what can happen. ‘It depends on all of us – the entire country – to follow the advice, to observe social distancing, and to keep that R down,’ he said.

But the moves go much further than those in the rest of the UK, as the united stance looks to be crumbling. Nicola Sturgeon joined Wales and Northern Ireland in condemning Mr Johnson’s decision to ditch the powerful ‘stay at home’ mantra this afternoon. The First Minister said the new ‘stay alert’ version – which even has a green rather than a red border design – was ‘vague’ and raised the risk that ‘people will die unnecessarily’. None of the rest of the UK will be using the new slogan.

Wales has already flatly dismissed the idea of schools coming back next month, and Ms Sturgeon has suggested there is little prospect of the returning north of the border until August. 

In a TV address to the nation from Downing Street tonight, Boris Johnson paid tribute to the ‘sacrifice’ of Britons in reining in the killer disease, and insisted the government’s top priority is to ensure those efforts are not ‘thrown away’

Boris Johnson is scrambling to defend the decision to ditch the blanket ‘stay at home, protect the NHS, save lives’ slogan, amid furious opposition from Nicola Sturgeon

Boris Johnson reasserts himself as PM of the UK as he rebukes Nicola Sturgeon over lockdown criticism

Boris Johnson tonight reasserted his authority as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom as he set out a lockdown exit strategy and rebuked Nicola Sturgeon. 

The First Minister of Scotland had earlier launched a furious attack on Mr Johnson for dropping the ‘stay at home’ lockdown mantra as she insisted she will keep using it for Scotland.

She complained that she had not been informed the slogan was being replaced before it was briefed out to the media. 

Addressing a briefing in Edinburgh after attending Cobra, she said she had demanded that the Westminster government does not deploy the new guidance in Scotland.

But Mr Johnson tonight made clear in his address to the nation that he is making decisions for all four of the Home Nations. 

He said he wanted to provide the UK with ‘the first sketch of a road map for reopening society’ to give people a ‘sense of the way ahead’.

He then said: ‘I have consulted across the political spectrum, across all four nations of the UK, and though different parts of the country are experiencing the pandemic at different rates and though it is right to be flexible in our response I believe that as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom – Scotland, England, Wales, Northern Ireland, there is a strong resolve to defeat this together.

‘And today a general consensus on what we could do. And I stress could. Because although we have a plan, it is a conditional plan.’  

On another pivotal day in the all-consuming crisis: 

  • The UK has recorded a further 269 coronavirus deaths across all settings, taking the total to 31,855;
  • The new ‘stay alert’ guidance has been designed with green edging – a striking contrast to the red colour scheme for the ‘stay home’ version; 
  • Mr Johnson is expected to confirm that garden centres will be allowed to open from Wednesday and publish guidance for safer working in offices – but tougher fines of up to £3,000 for breaches of the rules;
  • Airports and travel companies reacted with fury to plans to impose two weeks’ quarantine on anyone arriving in the country, including UK citizens returning from holiday;
  • The UK death toll rose by 346 to 31,587, including more than 200 healthcare workers. Globally there have been almost 4million cases with more than 276,000 lives lost so far;
  • Ministers voiced suspicion that political opponents and union barons were colluding to block schools reopening until pay demands were met, in a group they described as ‘The Blob’;
  • A poll has found Britons believe the government has handled the crisis worse than other major countries apart from the US; 
  • Mr Jenrick revealed that 40 per cent of Isle of Wight residents, around 50,000 people, have downloaded the NHS coronavirus tracking app in the first week; 
  • Statistician Professor David Speigelhalter has branded the government’s use of figures ’embarrassing’, saying test numbers were being misrepresented and the public was not being treated with ‘respect’. 

In the crucial speech, Mr Johnson said: ‘It is thanks to your effort and sacrifice in stopping the spread of this disease that the death rate is coming down and hospital admissions are coming down. 

‘Thanks to you we have protected our NHS and saved many thousands of lives.’

Mr Johnson warned that ‘now is not the time’ to lift the lockdown entirely, saying: ‘We must stay alert. We must continue to control the virus and save lives.’

‘We must continue to control the virus and save lives,’ he said.

‘And yet we must also recognise that this campaign against the virus has come at colossal cost to our way of life.

‘We can see it all around us in the shuttered shops and abandoned businesses and darkened pubs and restaurants.

‘And there are millions of people who are both fearful of this terrible disease, and at the same time also fearful of what this long period of enforced inactivity will do to their livelihoods and their mental and physical wellbeing.

‘To their futures and the futures of their children. So I want to provide tonight – for you – the shape of a plan to address both fears.

‘Both to beat the virus and provide the first sketch of a road map for reopening society.

He went on: ‘From this Wednesday we want to encourage people to take more and even unlimited amounts of outdoor exercise.’

Schools could start to reopen from June 1, says Boris Johnson 

Boris Johnson has said schools will not start to reopen until June 1 ‘at the earliest’ as he outlined his plan to lift the coronavirus lockdown.

The PM said pupils in reception, Year 1 and Year 6 will be the first to go back from the start of the month during the staged process.

But Wales and Scotland have already dismissed the idea, with Nicola Sturgeon suggesting there is little prospect of them returning north of the border until August.

Mr Johnson told the nation: ‘In step two – at the earliest by June 1 – after half term – we believe we may be in a position to begin the phased reopening of shops and to get primary pupils back into schools, in stages, beginning with reception, Year 1 and Year 6.

‘Our ambition is that secondary pupils facing exams next year will get at least some time with their teachers before the holidays.

‘And we will shortly be setting out detailed guidance on how to make it work in schools and shops and on transport.’

‘You can sit in the sun in your local park, you can drive to other destinations, you can even play sports but only with members of your own household.’

He added: ‘You must obey the rules on social distancing and to enforce those rules we will increase the fines for the small minority who break them.’

Mr Johnson said guidance will be issued to show how workplaces can become ‘Covid Secure’, amid threats from unions that staff will simply refuse to go back if their health and safety is not protected.

‘The first step is a change of emphasis that we hope that people will act on this week,’ Mr Johnson said.

‘We said that you should work from home if you can, and only go to work if you must.

‘We now need to stress that anyone who can’t work from home, for instance those in construction or manufacturing, should be actively encouraged to go to work.

‘And we want it to be safe for you to get to work. So you should avoid public transport if at all possible – because we must and will maintain social distancing, and capacity will therefore be limited.

‘So work from home if you can, but you should go to work if you can’t work from home.’

Mr Johnson sought to play down the splits within the UK, after the backlash from Ms Sturgeon, and her Welsh and Northern Irish counterparts Mark Drakeford and Arlene Foster. 

‘I have consulted across the political spectrum, across all four nations of the UK,’ he said. ‘And though different parts of the country are experiencing the pandemic at different rates.

‘And though it is right to be flexible in our response, I believe that as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom – Scotland, England, Wales, Northern Ireland, there is a strong resolve to defeat this together.

He said at the Cobra meeting today there was a ‘general consensus on what we could do’.

‘And I stress could,’ he said. ‘Because although we have a plan, it is a conditional plan.’

Nicola Sturgeon’s backdrop delivered a less than subtle message at her briefing in Edinburgh after Cobra this afternoon. The Scottish First Minister said the new advice was ‘vague and imprecise, adding: ‘I don’t know what ”stay alert” means.’

Nicola Sturgeon tweeted this morning that she had still not been formally told the PM was changing the ‘stay at home’ mantra – and made clear she has no intention of doing so


The PM has dropped the ‘stay at home, protect the NHS, save lives’ slogan in favour of a ‘stay alert’ version – which notably has green edging instead of red

PM vows to ‘rapidly reverse’ care home outbreaks 

Boris Johnson tonight vowed to ‘reverse rapidly’ the coronavirus outbreaks raging in Britain’s care homes.

In his address to the nation this evening, the Prime Minister said there is ‘much more work to be done’ in tackling the ‘awful epidemics’ in both care homes and in the NHS.

The virus has devastated homes for the elderly, with experts warning cases are pushing up the UK’s average transmission rate and are providing one of the biggest barriers to lifting the lockdown.

The government has come under increasing pressure for its handling of the care home crisis, which has cost the lives of thousands of elderly residents.

In his speech tonight, the Prime Minister acknowledged the horrific impact of the virus on care homes and said: ‘We must reverse rapidly the awful epidemics in care homes and in the NHS, and though the numbers are coming down sharply now, there is plainly much more to be done.’

 Ahead of his address to the nation, Ms Sturgeon condemned ditching the mantra that has brought the country to an effective standstill since March 23.

The First Minister said she had not been informed about the change, and insisted the simple guidance would remain in force in Scotland whatever the PM says. Her Welsh and Northern Irish counterparts Mark Drakeford and Arlene Foster also indicated they will keep telling people to stay at home.  

Addressing a briefing in Edinburgh after attending Cobra this afternoon, Ms Sturgeon said the new catchphrase was ‘vague and imprecise, adding: ‘I don’t know what ”stay alert” means.’ 

She warned that ‘people will die unnecessarily’ if progress against the disease is ‘squandered’ by ‘easing up too soon or by sending mixed messages that result in people thinking it is OK to ease up now’.

One of the government’s own advisers, behavioural expert Professor Susan Michie, joined the criticism saying the shift risked ‘undermining the good work over the last few weeks’.

In the face of the anger, Mr Johnson posted a fuller version spelling out that people are still being urged to ‘stay at home where possible’ and ‘stay alert’ when they do go out.

Meanwhile, there was anger among some senior ministers that parts of Mr Johnson’s speech were pre-recorded, before the full Cabinet and Cobra considered the issues today. Government sources insisted other elements were filmed after the measures had been considered.  

Mr Johnson claimed the UK is testing ‘literally hundreds of thousands of people every day – despite the government failing to hit its daily target for eight days in a row.

In his speech to the nation, the Prime Minister said Britain had made ‘fast progress’ on testing, even though Number 10 has repeatedly been accused of being too slow to respond to the crisis.

Figures released today show fewer than 93,000 tests were carried out on May 9, meaning officials haven’t met their ambitious pledge of 100,000 a day since May 2.

But questions have been raised as to whether ministers ever met the target, with Health Secretary Matt Hancock accused of blatantly fiddling the figures to hit his much-vaunted goal by the end of April.

PM claims UK is ‘testing literally hundreds of thousands a day’ 

Boris Johnson claimed the UK is testing ‘literally hundreds of thousands of people every day – despite the government failing to hit its daily target for eight days in a row.

In his speech to the nation, the Prime Minister said Britain had made ‘fast progress’ on testing, even though Number 10 has repeatedly been accused of being too slow to respond to the crisis.

Figures released today show fewer than 93,000 tests were carried out on May 9, meaning officials haven’t met their ambitious pledge of 100,000 a day since May 2.

But questions have been raised as to whether ministers ever met the target, with Health Secretary Matt Hancock accused of blatantly fiddling the figures to hit his much-vaunted goal by the end of April.

It comes after it was revealed today that up to 50,000 coronavirus test samples had to be sent from the UK to the US after ‘operational issues’ in the laboratory network led to delays in the system.

It comes after it was revealed today that up to 50,000 coronavirus test samples had to be sent from the UK to the US after ‘operational issues’ in the laboratory network led to delays in the system.

Earlier, the premier tried to play down expectations for his statement, telling the Sun on Sunday that mountaineers know that coming down from the peak is ‘the most dangerous bit’, as it is easy to ‘run too fast, lose control and stumble’. 

The first steps towards easing the curbs strangling the economy are set to be very tentative, after ministers were told that 18,000 new infections are still being recorded every day – far above the target of 4,000 for a wide-scale loosening. Scientists have warned 100,000 Britons could die by the end of the year if he gets it wrong.

A DefCon-style five stage system will be introduced to describe the country’s outbreak condition, with the UK currently being at the second most serious rating of four – meaning most of the lockdown must be maintained. 

With evidence increasingly suggesting the virus spreads far less readily in the open air, the once-a-day limit on outdoor exercise will be dropped.

The focus will also shift to getting businesses up and running where possible, with detailed guidance for firms on how they should operate, and garden centres allowed to open from Wednesday where two-metre ‘social distancing’ rules can be put in place. Travellers and shoppers could be urged to wear face coverings, as has already happened in Scotland.

Breaches of the more nuanced rules could be enforced with harsher fines, amid complaints from police that the enforcement so far has been ‘wishy washy. Plans are being drawn up to use ‘peer pressure’ to get people to self-isolate, as those who test positive will be told to get in touch with anyone they might have infected. 

Housing Secretary Robert Jenrick told Sky News this morning that the announcements will be ‘cautious’ and there will be no ‘grand reopening’ of the economy, but the premier will lay out a plan that ‘encourages people to go to work’. He insisted ‘stay at home’ will still be an important part of the government’s approach – and suggested controls could be targeted at specific neighbourhoods in future.   

How the government’s DefCon style five stage alert system for the UK’s coronavirus outbreak could work

Travellers to UK face two weeks in self-isolation

From June, all arrivals in the UK – including returning Britons – will be quarantined for 14 days and face £1,000 fines or deportation if they fail to do so.

The announcement of the new travel measures comes seven weeks into the nation-wide coronavirus lockdown.

Government officials are working to avoid a second wave of the bug, which has killed more than 31,000 people in the UK alone.

The regulations mean Britons hoping for a week in the sun in the summer months will have to book three-weeks off work to ensure they can isolate on their return.

Key workers and travellers from Ireland will be exempt from the quarantine.  

Travellers will have to fill in a digital form giving the address of where they will be in quarantine. This will then be checked at airports, ports and Eurostar stations, although it is not clear which agency will provide staff to do this or on what database the forms will be stored on.

The scheme will be enforced by spot checks on the addresses but ministers have not said whether this will involve the police, Border Force or NHS.

Mr Johnson tried to play down expectations for the speech earlier, telling the Sun on Sunday the ‘descent’ from a mountain was always the riskiest bit.   

‘That’s when you’re liable to be overconfident and make mistakes,’ he said. 

‘You have very few options on the climb up — but it’s on the descent you have to make sure you don’t run too fast, lose control and stumble.’ 

He tweeted an image of the full advice this afternoon, saying: ‘Everyone has a role to play in helping to control the virus by staying alert and following the rules. This is how we can continue to save lives as we start to recover from coronavirus.’ 

The full guidance says: ‘We can help control the virus if we all Stay Alert: by staying at home as much as possible; by working from home if you can; by limiting contact with other people; by keeping distance if you go out (2 metres apart where possible); by washing your hands regularly.’ 

But the updated slogan has already attracted a backlash for being much too soft to guard against a deadly and very contagious disease. 

Ms Sturgeon has previously warned that ditching the clear and simple advice will be ‘potentially catastrophic’. 

She tweeted this morning that she had still not been formally told the PM was changing the mantra. ‘It is of course for him to decide what’s most appropriate for England, but given the critical point we are at in tackling the virus, #StayHomeSaveLives remains my clear message to Scotland at this stage,’ she said. 

She added pointedly: ‘STAY HOME. PROTECT THE NHS. SAVE LIVES.’ 

At a briefing in Edinburgh this afternoon she complained that she did not really understand the new mantra in England.

Northern Ireland’s First Minister Arlene Foster said the province will stick with the ‘stay home, save lives’ message. 

China’s Xi Jinping ‘personally asked WHO to hold back information about human-to-human transmission and delayed the global response by four to six WEEKS’ 

A bombshell report claims Chinese President Xi Jinping personally asked World Health Organization Director-General Tedros Adhanom to ‘delay a global warning’ about the threat of COVID-19 during a conversation back in January.  

Germany’s Der Spiegel published the allegations this weekend, citing intelligence from the country’s Federal Intelligence Service, known as the ‘Bundesnachrichtendienst’ (BND). 

According to the BND: ‘On January 21, China’s leader Xi Jinping asked WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus to hold back information about a human-to-human transmission and to delay a pandemic warning. 

‘The BND estimates that China’s information policy lost four to six weeks to fight the virus worldwide’.

The WHO released a statement shortly after the publication of the shock claims, calling them ‘unfounded and untrue’.  

‘Dr Tedros and President Xi did not speak on January  21 and they have never spoken by phone. Such inaccurate reports distract and detract from WHO’s and the world’s efforts to end the COVID-19 pandemic,’ the statement read. 

It continued: ‘China confirmed human-to-human transmission of the novel coronavirus on January 20 [prior to the alleged phone conversation].

‘The WHO publicly declared on January 22 that ‘data collected … suggests that human-to-human transmission is taking place in Wuhan.”

Speaking to BBC Northern Ireland radio on Sunday, she said: ‘On the whole, the message is to stay at home. We will say we are not deviating from the message at this time.’ 

Prof Michie said the new slogan was ‘a long way from’ being clear and consistent. ‘Dropping the ‘stay at home’ message from the main slogan in favour of generalised alertness may be taken as a green light by many to not stay at home and begin socialising with friends and other activities that increase the risk of transmission,’ the UCL scientist said. 

‘This could potentially undermine the good work over the last few weeks that has seen impressively sustained high levels of adherence by the public in what for many are very challenging situations.’ 

Union chiefs have also threatened that members will be told not return to work unless it is safe to do so, while many Labour figures have criticised the government for its change of policy.  

Mr Jenrick shrugged off criticism that the message is confusing, saying: ‘Stay alert will mean stay alert by staying home as much as possible.’ 

‘But stay alert when you do go out by maintaining social distancing, washing your hands, respecting others in the workplace and the other settings that you will go to,’ ,’ he told the BBC’s Andrew Marr Show. 

Mr Jenrick told Sky’s Sophy Ridge On Sunday it was the right time to ‘update and broaden’ the message to the public. 

‘I think that’s what the public want and that they will be able to understand this message, which is that we should be staying home as much as possible but when we do go to work and go about our business we need to remain vigilant, we need to stay alert,’ he said. 

‘And that means things like respecting others, remaining two meters apart, washing your hands, following the social distancing guidelines because the virus continues to be prevalent, too many people are still dying of this and we’re going to have to live with it for a long time.’ 

Pressed if there is a danger the message is too woolly, Mr Jenrick said: ‘Well I hope not. ‘We need to have a broader message because we want to slowly and cautiously restart the economy and the country.’ 

Mr Jenrick went on: ‘We’re not going to take risks with the public. I understand people are anxious about the future but we want now to have a message which encourages people to go to work. 

‘Staying home will still be an important part of the message but you will be able to go to work and you will in time be able to do some other activities that you’re not able to do today.’  

Mr Jenrick said measures could be strengthened or relaxed locally to control the virus. 

Matt Hancock ‘told PM to ”give me a break” over criticism of response 

Health Secretary Matt Hancock urged Boris Johnson to  ‘give me a break’ in a furious bust-up over the coronavirus crisis.

Pressure intensified on Mr Hancock over his handling of the crisis last night after more than 25 million goggles were found to offer frontline NHS workers inadequate defence against the deadly virus.

The latest in a string of embarrassing Government failures over Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) came as senior sources suggested to The Mail on Sunday that Mr Hancock was now living ‘on borrowed time’ in the Cabinet.

One source claimed Boris Johnson had raised questions with Mr Hancock about his department’s grip on the crisis, only for the Minister to plead: ‘That’s not fair – give me a break.’

The 25.6 million pairs of Tiger Eye goggles bought for the NHS are not fit for purpose, according to the British Standards Institute: 15.9 million of them have already been distributed, with hospitals now being told to withdraw the remaining 9.7 million from use.

‘The evidence behind it will also be able to inform what we do at a local level and if we see there are outbreaks in particular localities, neighbourhoods, schools, towns, then we may be able to take particular measures in those places as we build up a more sophisticated and longer-term response to controlling the virus.’ 

There were signs early last week that the government was putting together major moves towards easing the lockdown. 

However, the ambitions have been scaled back, with Mr Johnson his most senior ministers – Dominic Raab, Michael Gove, Rishi Sunak and Matt Hancock – having thrashed out a limited strategy on Wednesday night, fearing that the country’s infection rate is still too high.  

The real figure is reported to be around 14,000 people a day, while the government’s target is said to be around 4,000, according to the Sunday Times.  

It has emerged the government’s Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) received warnings that there could be 100,00 deaths by the end of the year if measures are relaxed too far and too fast.  

A study by experts from the London School of Tropical Hygiene and College London modelled different approaches to ‘evaluate which were viable and which were not’ and reportedly concluded there was ‘very limited room for manoeuvre’. 

Policies such as allowing more than one household to mix in social ‘bubbles’, and reopening schools for more pupils have been put on hold. 

A No 10 source said that Mr Johnson, who is facing calls from Tory MPs to steer Britain clear of an economic recession, is ‘proceeding with maximum caution and maximum conditionality’ (pictured, people by Tower Bridge, London) 

Housing Secretary Robert Jenrick shrugged off criticism that the new message is confusing, saying: ‘Stay alert will mean stay alert by staying home as much as possible.’

Ministers’ claims on testing and death toll are ’embarrassing’, says eminent statistician  

Prof David Spiegelhalter said the public was not being treated with ‘respect’ because the government was not laying out figures in a ‘trustworthy’ way

Ministers’ claims on coronavirus testing and the death toll are ’embarrassing’, an eminent statistician said today.  

Prof David Spiegelhalter said the public was not being treated with ‘respect’ because the government was not laying out figures in a ‘trustworthy’ way.

The expert has been cited by Boris Johnson and other senior figures for his doubts about making international comparisons of death rates – but recently told them to stop claiming his views in support, as broad trends can be identified between countries.  

Speaking on the BBC’s Andrew Marr Show, Prof Spiegelhalter said he watched the most recent daily Downing Street press briefing and ‘found it completely embarrassing’.

‘We got lots of big numbers, precise numbers of tests done… well that’s not how many were done yesterday, it includes tests that were posted out,’ he said on the BBC’s Andrew Marr Show.

‘We are told 31,587 people have died – no they haven’t, it is far more than that.

‘So I think this is not trustworthy communication of statistics, and it is such a missed opportunity. There is a public out there who are broadly very supportive of the measures, they are hungry for details, for facts, for genuine information. And yet they get fed what I call number theatre, which seems to be coordinated much more by a No10 communications team rather than genuinely trying to inform people about what is going on.

‘I just wish that the data was being brought together and presented by people who really know its strengths and limitations and could treat the audience with some respect.’

‘The view is that the public will forgive us for mistakes made when going into the lockdown but they won’t forgive us for mistakes made coming out of it,’ an official told the Sunday Times.

Evidence of ‘coronaphobia’ among the public will have played a role in the decisions, with a poll for the Sun on Sunday showing 90 per cent of Britons oppose lifting restrictions this week. 

Even so, the tweaks being unveiled by Mr Johnson are set to provoke splits in the UK’s approach, with each nation having devolved powers.  

Welsh First Minister Mark Drakeford made clear his concerns about the ‘stay at home’ slogan being dropped this morning. He said he would be telling people in the principality that ‘if you are not out of your house for an essential purpose… staying at home remains the best way you can prtect yourself and others’. 

Scottish Health Secretary Jeane Freeman said she had ‘no idea’ what the new guidance meant. 

‘That is not a change that we would agree with. I think the First Minister was really clear last week that the ”stay at home” message was the right message and if I’m perfectly frank, I have no idea what ‘stay alert’ actually means,’ she told the BBC’s Sunday Politics Scotland. 

She added: ‘We’re asking the public to do a very great deal here and the least we can do is be consistent and clear in the message that we’re sending and stay at home is the right message.’ 

Professor Peter Horby, chair of the government’s New and Emerging Respiratory Virus Threats Advisory Group (Nervtag) told the BBC’s Andrew Marr Show the PM must be ‘incredibly cautious’.  

‘We have to be clear that this is not like a storm where we batten down the hatches and then it passes by and we walk out into the sunshine and it’s gone,’ he said.

‘It’s still out there. Most of us have not had this virus. So if we get this wrong it will very quickly increase across the population and we will be back in a situation of crisis.’So we have to be incredibly cautious about relaxing the measures.’

Mr Johnson will also announce a five-tier warning system, administered by a Joint Biosecurity Centre, to monitor the virus risk around the country and encourage public adherence to the new measures. 

The alerts will range from Level One (green) to Level Five (red), with Britain currently on Level Four.  

It will be administered by a Joint Biosecurity Centre, which will be responsible for detecting local spikes of Covid-19 so ministers can increase restrictions where necessary to help reduce the infection rates. 

Andy Burnham, the Labour Mayor of Greater Manchester, tweeted that it ‘feels to me like a mistake to me to drop the clear’ stay at home message. 

Dave Ward, general secretary of the Communication Workers Union, said: ‘The messaging from this Government throughout this crisis has been a total joke, but their new slogan takes it to a new level. Stay alert? It’s a deadly virus not a zebra crossing.’ 

However, there was praise for the new message from the Bruges Group think tank. It tweeted: ‘The Government’s new slogan is good. 

‘Green replaces red for a calmer feel. ‘Stay Alert’ replaces ‘Stay Home’ and underlines individual responsibility. ‘Control the Virus’ is a positive message. 

‘It’s within our power to achieve.’ 

An Opinium poll released today suggests the public thinks the UK’s response has been worse than other major countries – apart from the US

Boris Johnson’s speech in full: Prime Minister’s lockdown address to the nation 

Boris Johnson tonight unveiled a road map from lockdown in a pre-recorded address to the nation from Downing Street. Below is his full speech. 

It is now almost two months since the people of this country began to put up with restrictions on their freedom – your freedom – of a kind that we have never seen before in peace or war.

And you have shown the good sense to support those rules overwhelmingly.

You have put up with all the hardships of that programme of social distancing.

Because you understand that as things stand, and as the experience of every other country has shown, it’s the only way to defeat the coronavirus – the most vicious threat this country has faced in my lifetime.

And though the death toll has been tragic, and the suffering immense.

And though we grieve for all those we have lost.

It is a fact that by adopting those measures we prevented this country from being engulfed by what could have been a catastrophe in which the reasonable worst case scenario was half a million fatalities.

And it is thanks to your effort and sacrifice in stopping the spread of this disease that the death rate is coming down and hospital admissions are coming down.

And thanks to you we have protected our NHS and saved many thousands of lives.

And so I know – you know – that it would be madness now to throw away that achievement by allowing a second spike.

Boris Johnson addressed the nation from Downing Street to sketch out a road map from lockdown

We must stay alert.

We must continue to control the virus and save lives.

And yet we must also recognise that this campaign against the virus has come at colossal cost to our way of life.

We can see it all around us in the shuttered shops and abandoned businesses and darkened pubs and restaurants.

And there are millions of people who are both fearful of this terrible disease, and at the same time also fearful of what this long period of enforced inactivity will do to their livelihoods and their mental and physical wellbeing.

To their futures and the futures of their children.

So I want to provide tonight – for you – the shape of a plan to address both fears.

Both to beat the virus and provide the first sketch of a road map for reopening society.

A sense of the way ahead, and when and how and on what basis we will take the decisions to proceed.

I will be setting out more details in Parliament tomorrow and taking questions from the public in the evening.

I have consulted across the political spectrum, across all four nations of the UK.

And though different parts of the country are experiencing the pandemic at different rates.

And though it is right to be flexible in our response.

I believe that as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom – Scotland, England, Wales, Northern Ireland, there is a strong resolve to defeat this together.

And today a general consensus on what we could do.

And I stress could.

Because although we have a plan, it is a conditional plan.

And since our priority is to protect the public and save lives, we cannot move forward unless we satisfy the five tests.

We must protect our NHS.

We must see sustained falls in the death rate.

We must see sustained and considerable falls in the rate of infection.

We must sort out our challenges in getting enough PPE to the people who need it, and yes, it is a global problem but we must fix it.

And last, we must make sure that any measures we take do not force the reproduction rate of the disease – the R – back up over one, so that we have the kind of exponential growth we were facing a few weeks ago.

And to chart our progress and to avoid going back to square one, we are establishing a new Covid Alert System run by a new Joint Biosecurity Centre.

And that Covid Alert Level will be determined primarily by R and the number of coronavirus cases.

And in turn that Covid Alert Level will tell us how tough we have to be in our social distancing measures – the lower the level the fewer the measures.

The higher the level, the tougher and stricter we will have to be.

There will be five alert levels.

Level One means the disease is no longer present in the UK and Level Five is the most critical – the kind of situation we could have had if the NHS had been overwhelmed.

Over the period of the lockdown we have been in Level Four, and it is thanks to your sacrifice we are now in a position to begin to move in steps to Level Three.

And as we go everyone will have a role to play in keeping the R down.

By staying alert and following the rules.

And to keep pushing the number of infections down there are two more things we must do.

The Prime Minister pre-recorded the address which was broadcast at 7pm this evening 

We must reverse rapidly the awful epidemics in care homes and in the NHS, and though the numbers are coming down sharply now, there is plainly much more to be done.

And if we are to control this virus, then we must have a world-beating system for testing potential victims, and for tracing their contacts.

So that – all told – we are testing literally hundreds of thousands of people every day.

We have made fast progress on testing – but there is so much more to do now, and we can.

When this began, we hadn’t seen this disease before, and we didn’t fully understand its effects.

With every day we are getting more and more data.

We are shining the light of science on this invisible killer, and we will pick it up where it strikes.

Because our new system will be able in time to detect local flare-ups – in your area – as well as giving us a national picture.

And yet when I look at where we are tonight, we have the R below one, between 0.5 and 0.9 – but potentially only just below one.

And though we have made progress in satisfying at least some of the conditions I have given.

We have by no means fulfilled all of them.

And so no, this is not the time simply to end the lockdown this week.

Instead we are taking the first careful steps to modify our measures.

And the first step is a change of emphasis that we hope that people will act on this week.

We said that you should work from home if you can, and only go to work if you must.

We now need to stress that anyone who can’t work from home, for instance those in construction or manufacturing, should be actively encouraged to go to work.

And we want it to be safe for you to get to work. So you should avoid public transport if at all possible – because we must and will maintain social distancing, and capacity will therefore be limited.

So work from home if you can, but you should go to work if you can’t work from home.

And to ensure you are safe at work we have been working to establish new guidance for employers to make workplaces COVID-secure.

And when you do go to work, if possible do so by car or even better by walking or bicycle. But just as with workplaces, public transport operators will also be following COVID-secure standards.

And from this Wednesday, we want to encourage people to take more and even unlimited amounts of outdoor exercise.

You can sit in the sun in your local park, you can drive to other destinations, you can even play sports but only with members of your own household.

You must obey the rules on social distancing and to enforce those rules we will increase the fines for the small minority who break them.

And so every day, with ever increasing data, we will be monitoring the R and the number of new infections, and the progress we are making, and if we as a nation begin to fulfil the conditions I have set out, then in the next few weeks and months we may be able to go further.

In step two – at the earliest by June 1 – after half term – we believe we may be in a position to begin the phased reopening of shops and to get primary pupils back into schools, in stages, beginning with reception, Year 1 and Year 6.

Our ambition is that secondary pupils facing exams next year will get at least some time with their teachers before the holidays. And we will shortly be setting out detailed guidance on how to make it work in schools and shops and on transport.

And step three – at the earliest by July – and subject to all these conditions and further scientific advice; if and only if the numbers support it, we will hope to re-open at least some of the hospitality industry and other public places, provided they are safe and enforce social distancing.

Throughout this period of the next two months we will be driven not by mere hope or economic necessity.

We are going to be driven by the science, the data and public health.

And I must stress again that all of this is conditional, it all depends on a series of big Ifs.

It depends on all of us – the entire country – to follow the advice, to observe social distancing, and to keep that R down.

And to prevent re-infection from abroad, I am serving notice that it will soon be the time – with transmission significantly lower – to impose quarantine on people coming into this country by air.

And it is because of your efforts to get the R down and the number of infections down here, that this measure will now be effective.

And of course we will be monitoring our progress locally, regionally, and nationally and if there are outbreaks, if there are problems, we will not hesitate to put on the brakes.

We have been through the initial peak – but it is coming down the mountain that is often more dangerous.

We have a route, and we have a plan, and everyone in government has the all-consuming pressure and challenge to save lives, restore livelihoods and gradually restore the freedoms that we need.

But in the end this is a plan that everyone must make work.

And when I look at what you have done already.

The patience and common sense you have shown.

The fortitude of the elderly whose isolation we all want to end as fast as we can.

The incredible bravery and hard work of our NHS staff, our care workers.

The devotion and self-sacrifice of all those in every walk of life who are helping us to beat this disease.

Police, bus drivers, train drivers, pharmacists, supermarket workers, road hauliers, bin collectors, cleaners, security guards, postal workers, our teachers and a thousand more.

The scientists who are working round the clock to find a vaccine.

When I think of the millions of everyday acts of kindness and thoughtfulness that are being performed across this country.

And that have helped to get us through this first phase.

I know that we can use this plan to get us through the next.

And if we can’t do it by those dates, and if the alert level won’t allow it, we will simply wait and go on until we have got it right.

We will come back from this devilish illness.

We will come back to health, and robust health.

And though the UK will be changed by this experience, I believe we can be stronger and better than ever before.

More resilient, more innovative, more economically dynamic, but also more generous and more sharing.

But for now we must stay alert, control the virus and save lives.

Thank you very much.  

Police hit out at ‘wishy-washy’ government lockdown messages after sun-worshippers pack out parks and beaches on ‘hottest day of the year so far’

Police today lashed out at ‘wishy-washy’ enforcement of social distancing rules after sun-worshipping ‘covidiots’ packed out parks and beaches on the hottest day of the year so far. 

The Metropolitan Police Federation (MPF) complained the Government is sending out mixed messages after people basked in sunshine yesterday, when temperatures hit 26C (78.8F) on the south coast, making it hotter than Ibiza and St Tropez.

Chair Ken Marsh told BBC Radio 4 that authorities ‘needed to be firmer right from the beginning’.

He said: ‘It’s been quite wishy-washy how we’ve gone about it.

‘Had we been very stringent from the off – it is painful, but it’s not overly painful in terms of what you’re actually being asked to do – then I think we would have a better result now.’ 

Hackney police says it is ‘fighting a losing battle’ as hundreds of people flock to London parks, including London Fields (pictured), to eat pizza, drink wine and eat ice cream on Saturday

Hundreds flocked to London Fields where Hackney police said they were powerless to stop those out enjoying the sun from drinking and eating pizza. 

In scenes replicated around the country, the Coastguard said that on Friday it had the highest number of call-outs since lockdown began, with 97 incidents, 54 per cent more than the average of 63 for the month. 

Traffic police in Brighton were stopping cars at the end of the A23 which leads to the south coast seaside mecca and officers have fined visitors trying to visit for the bank holiday.  

Hackney Police tweeted a picture of London Fields adding: ‘Sadly we’re fighting a losing battle in the parks today. Literally hundreds of people sitting having pizza, beers, wines. 

‘As always a big thank you to those that are observing the guidelines.’

Health officials have said they fear Britons are starting to get complacent about the Covid-19 lockdown after traffic and mobile phone data revealed more people are on the roads and looking for directions.

Professor Stephen Powis, national medical director of NHS England, said on Saturday that ‘there was a little bit of concern’ after the unseasonably warm weather drew big crowds to public spaces.

A police checkpoint turns away cars trying to get into Brighton as bored families break coronavirus lockdown rules

Covidiots flock to Burgess Park in South London, ignoring social distancing advice and packing out pathways and benches

Families with young children queue for ice cream near Greenwich Park in London on Saturday as the ice cream seller dons a face mask despite customers lining up shoulder-to-shoulder

Police officers on patrol in a South London park are exasperated as they ask sunbathers and people enjoying picnics to leave

An ice cream seller takes orders from behind a plastic screen while wearing a face mask as crowds line up behind customers

Police had to clear beaches at Southend-on-Sea, Essex, after sun-seekers flocked to the coast to enjoy the warm water

A man is stopped by police officers on the beach in Essex after ignoring the government’s guidelines to stay at home

Lockdown flouters are removed from the beach in Southend-on-Sea after ignoring the government’s advice to stay indoors

Hundreds of people flocked to the Essex seaside town in groups clearly flouting the government’s lockdown guidance

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Fire breaks out in Moscow coronavirus hospital killing one

Fire breaks out in Moscow coronavirus hospital killing one as medical staff in hazmat suits wheel patients into the street to safety

  • The fire erupted in a patient’s room at a purpose-built Covid-19 hospital tonight
  • Moscow officials recorded one fatality and said the blaze had now been put out 
  • The virus has so far infected nearly 200,000 people and caused more than 1,800 deaths in Russia
  • Here’s how to help people impacted by Covid-19

One person was killed after a fire broke out on Saturday at a Moscow hospital treating patients infected with the new coronavirus, authorities said.

The hospital, located in northwestern Moscow, had been designated by the authorities as one of the medical facilities treating coronavirus patients in the Russian capital.

The emergency ministry told the RIA news agency that the blaze erupted in a patient’s room, without providing further details. The fire has since been put out, the authorities said. 

Images from the scene show medical staff wearing full PPE, and some in Hazmat suits, wheeling patients out on to the street to avoid the blaze.   

Evacuating patients during a fire at Moscow’s Spasokukotsky hospital tonight

Medical workers evacuate a patient wearing protective gear at Spasokukotskogo Hospital in Moscow, Russia tonight

Traffic police officers are seen outside Moscow’s Spasokukotsky hospita tonight. The fire has been contained; one casualty has been reported. The urology department of the hospital was repurposed into an inpatient facility for patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 coronavirus infection

Sergei Sobyanin, the mayor of Moscow, wrote on Twitter that all patients had been evacuated and would be transferred to other hospitals.

‘The causes of this incident will be thoroughly investigated,’ Sobyanin wrote.

Moscow and several other regions have been on lockdown since late March to stem the spread of the coronavirus, which has so far infected nearly 200,000 people and caused more than 1,800 deaths in Russia. 

More than half of the country’s cases and deaths have been recorded in Moscow, a sprawling city of 12.7 million.

The number of Russian coronavirus cases this week overtook French and German infections to become the fifth-highest in the world.

Pictured: Firefighters mobilise to put out the fire at the coronavirus hospital in Moscow this evening 

During a Victory Day speech at the Red Square today, President Vladimir Putin made no mention of the virus, though Russia is now the fifth hardest-hit country and 10,000 new cases have been confirmed each day this week.  

Officials say the number of confirmed infections has risen by another 10,817 to reach a total of 198,676.

Russia says the increase is due in part to a huge testing campaign, while the country’s reported mortality rate is much lower than in many countries, with 1,827 dead.

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I want to throw my son out for playing Xbox all day after being furloughed – The Sun

DEAR DEIDRE: OUR 21-year-old son is on furlough and is driving me and my wife nuts. He’s turned into an Xbox lout.

I’m off work on lockdown as is our son. He has always been headstrong but since lockdown he’s turned into a disrespectful hooligan.


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He seems to delight in playing loud music from when we go to bed. If I say anything about it he laughs at me and calls me all the rude names under the sun.

We’re in our mid-40s and I feel like telling him to go, once lockdown ends. What do you think? He’s not too bad usually but his lack of respect is getting us down.

DEIDRE SAYS: Don’t threaten to throw him out. He’s still that decent lad underneath but doesn’t know how to handle the current extreme pressures appropriately. Set him a good example.

Say the three of you need a round-table conference to decide house rules you’ll all respect.

He must listen to music on headphones after your bedtime, but look for an activity you can share with him so he doesn’t feel so bottled up. Think outdoors and exercise.

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Check out this week’s top DVD picks from disturbing German horror Hagazussa to ultra-violence in French drama Revenge – The Sun

HARROWING German horror Hagazussa strays into seriously disturbing territory to deliver pagan chills and unforgettable images, with echoes of genre classics Midsommar and The Witch.

French drama Revenge is a stylish but insubstantial exercise in ultra-violence. And DC unleashes a suitably apocalyptic conclusion to its Darkseid saga.

HAGAZUSSA

(18) 104mins, out now

MESMERISING German folk-horror set in a remote village in the 15th century, opening on Twelfth Night with some distinctly unfestive goings-on are afoot.

The subtitle A Heathen’s Curse hints at what is to come — a patient, disturbing and very adult slow-burner unafraid to explore some seriously dark territory.

We begin with wide-eyed youngster Albrun, whose elderly and rather poorly mother is accused of witchcraft by surly locals in oddball outfits. And you can kind of see why.

What follows is a masterclass in creeping dread. Long stretches are wordless, with the story told through unforgettable pagan imagery, oblique title cards (“Shadows”, “Horn”, “Blood”) and the expressive central performance of Aleksandra Cwen as the grown-up Albrun.

A superior piece of filmmaking, dating from 2017 and finally coming to disc, with echoes of The Witch and Midsommar, that will linger long after watching. Especially if you have a phobia of goats.

★★★★

REVENGE

(18) 108mins, out Monday

STYLISH, violent and vacuous French thriller that comes to disc a couple of years after splattering across a handful of cinema screens.

Matilda Lutz plays Jen, the party-girl who delivers bloody payback on the Eurotrash creeps who leave her for dead in the desert in an extremely uncomfortable position.

Director Coralie Fargeat delivers plenty of male nudity alongside the wince-inducing ultra-violence, though this still feels grubbily exploitative somehow.

Certainly, it is not as honest as last year’s bracingly brutal Vigilante, the former of which redressed rampaging misogyny in rather less glossy fashion, or as sparsely arty as Holiday.

Still, what it sets out to do, it does well enough. At times, it is astonishingly grisly. But hardly an edifying spectacle — certainly not for the faint-hearted, and perhaps not for anyone else either.

★★★☆☆

JUSTICE LEAGUE DARK: APOKOLIPS WAR

(15) 86mins, out May 18

THE title isn’t the only unwieldy thing about this overstuffed animated epic from DC, which brings together anyone who’s anyone in the DC universe, from Batman and Harley Quinn to demon-fighting John Constantine. He is the sweary, chain-smoking Scouser who got that underwhelming live-action movie starring Keanu Reeves 15 years ago.

This is solid enough animated fare, with some interesting visuals and a few flashes of wry humour from Constantine. But it lacks the depth of the genre’s best and doesn’t really function as a standalone movie.

Without investment in the preceding saga, in which supervillain Darkseid (voiced by Candyman’s Tony Todd) lays waste to the Earth, the smashing, exploding and wisecracking feels random, inessential, despite some bracingly bleak moments. Too dark for kids, decent for devotees.

★★★☆☆

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